The Hard Part & Real Job of a Professional Guide

Heading out on a Summer Pack TripWhen asked, “What is the hardest part of being a big game guide?” enough times, I started asking the ones that I have the most respect for. Professional Big Game Guides, Guide-Outfitters in the far north. Whether it be in Alaska, North West Territories, Yukon, British Columbia or Northern Alberta.

I am sure most if not all Guides / Guide-Outfitters will agree that most of the time the actual guiding, stalking, judging, the skinning, fleshing, salting, general handling and caring for the hides, cooking, making lunches, saddling up the horses or gassing up and checking the oil and tires of the four-wheelers or doing a preflight checks on your Super-Cub or getting your backpack checked-over, making sure all the food, lanterns, matches, tents, first aid and everything else is packed and all ready to be strapped down and ready to pack, packing out the meat and trophies, are not really the hard thing about guiding clients for big game.Professional Guides

Stalking and getting up close to big game is not the hard part of a big game guide’s job. We, mankind, even womankind, are the top of the line, the most vicious and dangerous predator on the face of Earth. There is no other specie on this planet that is as intelligent, as cunning, versatile and just flat out unstoppable in it’s endeavor to survive as the human race.

So, you may be wondering, “So, what IS the hardest part of a guide’s job?”

It is being a friend to a perfect stranger. A partner, a teacher, a companion. This is the “Hunt of a Lifetime” for him or her. A guide’s job is to do the very best to make that dream come true. A guide cannot control weather or the game. What can be controlled, at least as far as it can, is the atmosphere in camp, in the field. Hunting is a challenge, not a given or sure thing.Professional Guides

The Teamwork and Loving what you do. This combination makes for great memories, anticipation, the rush is what we are after, day after day. When a kills comes, it is almost anti-climHeading Homeatic, it’s over. Sure, the client has his trophy, and that is why he came to us, and has been planning for, at times been planning for years, and now, it’s over. Sure, the client had his hunt and hopefully has a great trophy as well.

But, when he returns home, he will in actuality, only have the memories. THAT is a guide’s job. A guide’s job is to make sure that when a client returns home that those memories he takes with him are good memories and those memories last forever. This is the real job. We are in the memory business.

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9 Responses to The Hard Part & Real Job of a Professional Guide

  1. Hey y’all can’t wait to start guide training with y’all next summer Im really stoked and anxious to get on up there! Ive talked to Terry a couple of times and been saving up on money for the trip! And keep up these posts there awesome and helpful!

    • Reno-Beau,
      Have you sent me your address to get the paperwork rolling yet? If so, I missed it! (Sorry:) )
      Fill out a Contact us form here on the website and lets get moving forward! Yay!
      ~ Amber-Lee, aka Alaska Chick

      • Okay sounds great Amber! Thanks for replying! And is there any kind of fees that I need to pay in order to come on up?

        • Reno-Beau,
          Any money/fees talk is with Terry, not me! LOL, just give him a call or send your phone number as well as your mailing address and I will have him call you.
          Take Care,
          Amber-Lee

  2. Amber,
    Sorry for constantly replying on this but I emailed my address and my email to you and I tried calling the number on the site but it won’t work. Please help me get in contact with y’all. Much appreciated

    • Hmm, I received your mailing address, but not your contact number, Reno-Beau.
      I have not been told of any issues with the phone system (we do have them…) so, 907-734-0007 is the number to call.
      Let me know, either way and send me your contact info, ok?
      ~ Amber-Lee

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